Cleaning Disc Pad And Brake Shoe Break-In (Burnish) Procedure -

Cleaning Disc Pad And Brake Shoe Break-In (Burnish) Procedure

An effective burnish cycle to seat the friction materials into the opposing rotor and drum surfaces requires approximately 200 stops. The 200 stops are consistent with the burnish procedure outlined in the FMVSS 105 and FMVSS 135.

An effective burnish cycle to seat the friction materials into the opposing rotor and drum surfaces requires approximately 200 stops. The 200 stops are consistent with the burnish procedure outlined in the FMVSS 105 and FMVSS 135. As 200 stops may not be practical for many repair shops, we recommend the following burnish procedure:

• Make approximately 20 complete stops from 30 mph

– OR –

• Perform 20 slowdowns from 50 mph to 20 mph with light to moderate pedal pressure
• NO PANIC STOPS
• Allow at least 30 seconds between brake applications for the brake pads or shoes to cool down
• It is critical to follow cooldown procedures to avoid damaging NAO, ceramic and semi-metallic friction material, as well as the rotor/drum
• No high-speed stops and/or braking under heavy loads that could result in glazed or otherwise damaged linings

Pre-burnish

Pre-burnish

Using these guidelines, the friction materials will have conformed to the surfaces of the rotors and drums for improved stopping performance. In addition, the thermal conditioning of the friction materials during this process will increase the stability of braking effectiveness over a greater range of temperatures compared to when they were first installed.

Post-burnish

Post-burnish

It’s a good practice for repair shops to communicate with their customers that the friction materials and rotors have been conditioned and that the customers should continue this process by avoiding aggressive braking for a couple of days. Good communication will be helpful and prevent comebacks.

Article courtesy of Wagner Brake.

You May Also Like

Multi-Link Front Suspensions

Why do some suspensions have so many ball joints? Here’s why.

In the 1960s, many domestic and import OEMs replaced kingpins with ball joints. The change helped to reduce maintenance and improve suspension geometry. By the 1970s, finding a light vehicle with kingpins was almost impossible. Today, you can commonly find suspensions with as many as five ball joints on a corner. These multi-link front suspension designs can be found on domestic and import nameplate vehicles from GM, Ford, Audi and Mercedes-Benz. 

January Crossword Puzzle Winners Announced

Here are the 10 randomly selected winners from all complete Crossword entries. You can’t win if you don’t play!

Livestream: OBD Zero Diagnostics In An OBDII World

Join us at 2PM EST on Friday, February 25 for this live event sponsored by Summit Racing.

US Auto Industry Update: What You Need To Know

Automotive industry expert Daron Gifford, of Plante Moran, discusses the outlook for doing business in the U.S.

More Than A Model – Building Small-Scale Race Cars

The builds feature every detail of the real vehicle both inside and out and give the illusion of a real car.

Other Posts

Tool Up For Belts

Here are six tools to make your next belt replacement more productive.

Integrated Wheel Ends

The leading cause of IWE failure is water finding its way into the vacuum lines under the hood and in the wheel well.

JEEP Steering Shimmy Solution

Replacement of the steering damper with AE level or newer is recommended.

Wheel Speed Sensors and Bearings

The only way to diagnose the sensor and circuit is with a scan tool or scope.