How much U.S. EV infrastructure is enough?

How much U.S. EV infrastructure is enough?

As charging technology changes, so will our estimates of infrastructure needed to keep up with EV adoption.

Courtesy of The Buzz by David Sickels

Talk to anyone who doesn’t consider EVs to be the bee’s knees and charging will inevitably come up. We don’t have enough! Where’s it all going to go? Where’s the electricity going to come from?

Legitimately, these are actually good questions. Let’s break it down.

To answer this infrastructure conundrum, EV supporters can point to the over 140,000 EV charging stations currently deployed across the U.S. – hey, that’s a lot!

However… no it’s not. Today, with so few EVs on the road, maybe this will do, but according to a recent study by S&P Global Mobility, we’re really going to need to pick up the pace. Even when home-installed chargers are taken into account, to properly match forecasted EV sales demand, the U.S. will need to see the number of EV chargers quadruple between now and 2025, and grow more than eight-fold by 2030.

Now, a study by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in the United States found that a ratio of one public charging station for every 10 to 20 EVs in a given area would be, in general, sufficient to meet the charging needs of most EV drivers.

With that in mind, new vehicle EV market share is likely to reach 40% by 2030, at which point the total number of EVs in operation could reach 28.3 million units.

To support that EV car parc, S&P says by 2027 there will be a need for about 1.2 million Level 2 chargers and 109,000 Level 3 chargers deployed nationally. Looking to 2030, with the assumption of 28.3 million EVs on U.S. roads, an estimated total of 2.13 million Level 2 and 172,000 Level 3 public chargers will be required – all in addition to the units that consumers put in their own garages.

A 2020 report by the Rocky Mountain Institute estimates that total number to be around 4 million chargers total by 2030 to support a fleet of 28 million electric vehicles.

So, we aren’t quite on the right pace to meet EV projections – but there is hope. Currently, 35 states have signed on for federal assistance under the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, of which $7.5 billion is earmarked for EV charging infrastructure. Now, the Biden Administration has pledged that the government will fund the installation of half a million charging stations – but, of course, that’s small potatoes in the grand scheme.

One more beacon of hope is this: Technology, believe it or not, changes.

Battery swapping, wireless charging, and even the increased deployment of DC wallbox solutions at home are three solutions that will change the landscape. In China and Vietnam, battery swapping is starting to catch on, though it’s virtually nowhere in Europe and the U.S. Not to mention, there are numerous companies working on EV batteries with completely different chemical compositions. If any of these should catch on, who knows what it will mean for charging as we know it.

More EV Impact Show With David Sickels Available Here

You May Also Like

Zapp EV to Appoint Manufacturing Partner in India

Bounce Electric 1 Private Limited will be Zapp’s contract manufacturing partner for sales of the vehicle in India.

Zapp Electric Vehicles Group Limited announced that it intends to appoint Bounce Electric 1 Private Limited as its contract manufacturing partner for sales of the i300 in India. Bounce already operates a domestic vehicle assembly facility and may further assist with distribution of i300 in the country.

“India is one of the largest markets in the world for sales of two-wheelers and the number of premium models sold there is estimated to be more than four times the number of all models sold in the US," said Swin Chatsuwan, founder and CEO of Zapp EV. "We think the design attributes of i300 make it an excellent solution for personal mobility with India’s growing purchasing power and urban densification. Our plan to scale the business in India from an initial minimum capacity of 5,000 units per year is not dependent on any dedicated charging infrastructure since the i300’s removable and portable battery packs can be charged from any wall socket, making this a huge market opportunity for both companies.”

US CBP to Use Verdek Chargers for its Ford F-150 Lightnings

US Customs and Border Protection will use this mobile, fully off-grid charging station, complete with dual ports and powered by renewable energy.

UL Solutions to Construct Advanced EV Battery Testing Center

The new testing center in Pyeongtaek, Gyeonggi-do, Korea, will expand current UL Solutions’ battery testing capacity in the region and add EV charger testing capabilities.

Blink Charging Achieves ‘In Process’ FedRAMP Status

Once fully accredited, Blink’s EV charging network will be available to government agencies.

Volvo Cars Starts Production of Fully Electric EX90 SUV

The EX90 is based on its next-gen EV technology base, with a fully electric range of up to 372 miles.

Other Posts
EV Safety Basics on the Shop Floor – Part II

As long as you follow the EV guidelines, you are going to have to use the proper PPE and insulated tools.

EV Safety Basics on the Shop Floor – Part I

It’s critical to utilize OEM service information and procedures for each and every hybrid or EV.

Hitachi Astemo Developing Steer-by-Wire Technologies for EVs

The company is also creating a 360-degree-camera that provides LiDAR-like results for autonomous vehicles.

ABB E-mobility Releases the A400 All-in-One Charger

ABB E-mobility said it designed the A400 with the aim of achieving a 10-year product lifetime.