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Midland College to Recognize Students in Automotive, Diesel and Collision Programs

On Thursday, May 17, Midland College (Midland, TX) will be holding an awards banquet to recognize the students who have participated in the school’s automotive, diesel and collision technology programs. More than 400 high school and college students are enrolled in the programs.

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Midland College to Recognize Students in Automotive, Diesel and Collision Programs

On Thursday, May 17, Midland College (Midland, TX) will be holding an awards banquet to recognize the students who have participated in the school’s automotive, diesel and collision technology programs. More than 400 high school and college students are enrolled in the programs.

Below is the article as it appeared on the Mywesttexas.com website.

High schoolers gain auto tech training

May 14, 2012

By Meredith Moriak

Students in the automotive, diesel and collision technology programs at Midland College will be recognized for their efforts this year during an awards banquet Thursday at the Advanced Technology Center.

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More than 400 high school and college students participate in training programs that provide students a good foundation for life, program director Ted Sumners said.

"It’s OK to learn to take things apart and put them back together," Sumners said. "You learn it’s a lot of fun in the process. We learn how things are made and students can go into any industry with this skill set."

For high school students like Cody Carlton, taking the class allowed him to learn more about cars and feel comfortable doing things like changing the brakes.

"I have an interest in automotive technology and I wanted to learn more," Carlton said. "I knew some things when I came in, but I’ve learned a lot more."

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First year high school students in the automotive technology program get a "crash course" in eight automotive areas including brakes, steering suspension, engine performance, engine repair, heating and air conditioning, electrical, manual drive and the transmission.

Lab instructor Anthony Cummins said this allows students to understand the basics of each area and know what might interest them.

"Kids in high school always complain about having to learn stuff they’ll never use in real life, but these are skills you can use once you get out of school," Cummins said.

If high school students take a second year, they can learn more in-depth technology and easily transition into the college’s associate degree program, Cummins said.

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To read the entire article on the Mywesttexas.com website, click HERE.

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