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Standard Motor Products Announces Scholarship Recipients

Standard Motor Products recently announced the five recipients of its $1,000 scholarships.

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uofaloggo623Standard Motor Products recently announced the five recipients of its $1,000 scholarships.

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Recipients for the 2016 scholarships are:

• Nicholas Cover of Ocala, Fla., attending Withlacoochee Technical College in automotive service technology
• Daniel Cvinar of Peabody, Mass., attending Nashua Community College in automotive technology
• Conner Gunnoe of Rigby, Idaho, attending Brigham Young University in automotive technology management
• John Metcalf of Tampa, Fla., attending Erwin Technical College in the automotive technician program
• Chandler Thompson of Mill Hall, Pa., attending the Pennsylvania College of Technology in automotive technology

“This year’s applicants were outstanding and we are pleased to make this investment in the industry’s future,” said Larry Sills, executive chairman, Standard Motor Products.

The Standard Motor Products Scholarships were established in 2010 with a pledge by the company of $25,000 to fund five $1,000 scholarships each year for five years for students planning careers as automotive technicians.

Additional scholarship funding comes from industry contributions provided by individuals, companies and foundations. Contributions can be made to the UAF Scholarship Fund, University of the Aftermarket Foundation, c/o Julie Brehm, Auto Care Association, 7101 Wisconsin Ave., Suite 1300, Bethesda, MD 20814, 240-333-1046. Please designate any contribution to be restricted for scholarships. UAF is a 501c (3) organization.

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