Work From Home? What Is That?

Work From Home? What Is That?

While some employees argue about working from home, techs and shop owners have continued working without complaint.

This month feels like things are returning to normal. Many states are opening up, and the number of new cases is dropping. With the Covid-19 pandemic coming to an end, many people are trying to make the case on why they shouldn’t return to the office and be allowed to work from home. What they forget is some of us never had that option.

Over the past 16 months, most shop owners came into the shop almost every day and did not get a vacation. Through outbreaks and surges, shops never closed their doors or reduced their hours. Shops had to become public health experts to protect both their employees and customers. 

The first few months of 2020 were brutal. Many shops saw a significant decline in car counts and revenue as everyone remained locked down. It was not until June or July when shops saw business return to normal levels. Shops were keeping essential workers like nurses, doctors and grocery store workers on the road. But we also were keeping vehicles for services like Grub Hub, Uber and Amazon up and running.

Many office workers have enjoyed their time at home. It has been a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to get to know their children and save money on clothes and commuting. For many workers, commuting to the home office gave them back two hours of their day. But like it or not, they will eventually have to return to the office. 

Some in the media predict a “great resignation” will happen in the next few months as companies require employees to return to the office. It makes me laugh. Working from home was once a luxury and not a necessity. Now that it is no longer a necessity, some think they are entitled to work from home.

All the same time, technicians and shop owners have been going into work without a complaint. I think you deserve some recognition for the sacrifices you have made during the pandemic to keep the economy moving. It doesn’t have to be a parade or national holiday, just an acknowledgment of the bravery shops showed to keep their doors open during the pandemic.

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